A WORD FROM THE TOP

This month we’re featuring a great article on job interviews written by Scott Wintrip for ERE Online (see below).  The title is a bit controversial, however over my years of working in recruitment and HR I’ve seen less than transparent interviewing and hiring practices happen over and over again. 
Most people come to an interview prepared to “sell themselves” to a potential employer, and many employers are now “selling” the benefits of working for their company to potential employees (a result of the current labour shortage).  Here’s where it gets tricky… when you are trying to stand out from the crowd (whether an employer or an employee) it seems these days there’s a tendency to “over sell” yourself.  The result, disappointment on both sides, the new employee isn’t as great as they represented themselves to be, and the employer isn’t the “greatest place to work!”.Not only does Scott Wintrip do a good job of identifying the different areas where “lies” can happen during the interview process, he also offers some great suggestions to ensure that this is not happening when you are hiring.If you have any questions about the effectiveness of your hiring process please feel free to give us a call.Hope you had a Happy Easter!Sandra Reder, CPC
President
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INTERVIEWS ARE ROOTED IN LIES. HERE’S HOW TO STOP PARTICIPATING IN THE DECEPTION.

Credit: Scott Wintrip, ERE

It has been said of some salespeople that you can easily spot when they’re lying — their lips are moving. Salespeople aren’t the only ones giving lip service to the truth. Job interviews are frequently built on one or more lies.

The lying is happening on both sides of the table. Candidates misrepresent their abilities. Companies overstate the facts. Both parties omit details.

The farcical dance that defines many interviews undermines effective selection. Candidates accept ill-fitting jobs based upon incomplete information. Companies end up having good interviews that turn into bad hires.

Sometimes the lies told by candidates and companies are intentional. Often the deception is unconscious. People are simply doing things the way they’ve always been done, unaware of the consequences.

Stopping the deception requires understanding and interrupting these lies. Let’s take a look at some of the different types of lying common in the hiring process.Read more…

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THIS IS HILARIOUS!

Lie Detective: Jimmy Kimmel and the “truth” fairy give the gears to little kids.

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