Loading...

The Best Time of Year to Hire Employees

Written by Sandra Reder

Senior Human Resource Consultant, Founder and President
Vertical Bridge HR 

We continue to hear about the shortage of available workers, and the difficulty companies are having finding quality people. You may be wondering why this is, and as an employer when is the best time (and worst time) of the year to be hiring?

We break down the best time to hire employees using the 5Ws:

  1. Who are you looking to hire?
  2. What type of compensation are you offering? Are you competitive?
  3. When should you hire new employees?
  4. Where should you be posting your open job opportunities?
  5. Why should you wait to hire until the Fall?
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

1. Who are you looking to hire?

Prior to posting the position be clear on who and what expertise you’re looking for. Have a well thought out job description and some good interview questions developed so you can ensure consistency in your recruiting process. After you have posted the position, it’s important to keep an open mind about who your potential candidates may be. There may be a candidate who doesn’t have the exact qualifications you had in mind; however, they may have transferable skills and end up being the perfect individual for the role. Sometimes the fit is more important than technical skills, in many cases they can be taught. Keep an open mind and be creative in your recruiting.

2. What type of compensation are you offering? Are you competitive?

In addition to ensuring that you are paying competitively, compensation does not have to directly mean the salary you are offering. Think about what other additional benefits you are offering and share this in the job posting. Do you have an education incentive? Do you offer extended health benefits? RRSP contributions/matching etc? These perks can help you stand out from your competitors, and perhaps make a potential candidate apply to your role rather than passing it by. We also recommend posting a salary range as this helps candidates determine whether or not the position is in line with their salary expectations. It saves both you and them time if your compensation range is not in line with what they are looking for.

3. When should you hire new employees?

Summer is a challenging time of the year to try and attract new talent.  Many people are focused on taking time off before the kids head back to school and they are not looking for a change in their careers. It’s our experience that typically September and January are the best times for hiring. With the start of a new school year in September, and a new calendar year in January people are often looking to make changes and create fresh starts. You have a better chance of attracting more job seekers during September and January.

4. Where should you be posting your open job opportunities?

Online job boards and on social media. Have you ever heard of the phrase “sharing is caring”? This goes along with job postings as well. If an individual finds a job posting they think is relevant and interesting, but perhaps not the right fit for their skills, making the posting hyper shareable will enable them to send it to other people in their network who may be a better fit. If your social media presence is active, you likely already have fans of your company so this is a great place to announce any open positions you may have.

5. Why should you wait to hire until the Fall?

If you have the luxury of waiting to expand your team, do it, this will increase your chances of finding the right person for the role. Our recruitment team, can also do the searching for you, and approach a possible candidate who may not be actively looking to make a change.

Recruiting the best person for your role can be an overwhelming experience. Hiring someone to take this guess work out of where to begin and how to find the needle in the haystack could save you time, and in the long run money. Our recruitment team together has decades of experience, and can offer support in a partial search role, or do the heavy lifting for you in a full search.

About the Author

For over 20 years, Sandra has been a driving force within the human resource community. Her understanding of current HR best practices and trends is extensive, and her desire to ensure that Vertical Bridge is providing innovative programs and services to their clients is what drives her and the business forward. She has worked within a wide range of industries including healthcare, private sector, not-for-profit and public sector.

Over the years she has been privy to information that few employers ever hear directly from their employees. She became aware that many employers do not realize how they are perceived by their employees. That awareness produced Sandra’s strong interest in assisting employers to ensure that they are creating engaging and respectful workplaces. In 2005 Sandra founded Vertical Bridge, a full service HR and recruitment consulting practice.

In late 2014 Sandra identified a need for human resources support within the healthcare sector. She founded HealthBridge HR, offering a variety of HR solutions specifically for health care practitioners providing them with the HR expertise that they would not otherwise have access to.

Sandra is a well-regarded facilitator and speaker on a variety of subjects, including HR Best Practices and Inter-Generational Communication within the Workplace. She is a sought after keynote speaker on the topic of human resources and has presented at numerous association and industry conferences.

She is actively involved with HRMA (the Human Resources Management Association), Sandra currently sits on a number of Boards, including EMBERS, a downtown Eastside social enterprise and the Developmental Disabilities Association. Sandra is the past chapter president of the Association of Canadian Search, Employment and Staffing Services and past Chair of the Board of Governors for the Developmental Disabilities Foundation. She also has had the privilege of sitting on the local Chapter Board of Room to Read and she has actively volunteered her time with Covenant House in Vancouver.

Go to Top